Hey—I’m Usually the One Asking the Questions

As a freelance writer, I’m usually the one asking the questions and scribbling down the answers in a form of shorthand only I can decipher.

But every now and then, someone asks to interview me about writing, publishing, marketing books, or putting together a magazine. I hold a firm belief that we writers have a duty and obligation to help young and emerging writers, so I agree to the interview, if time allows.

That’s how it happened late last year. I was contacted by Deyse Bravo, a librarian at McKee Library on the campus of Southern Adventist University in Collegedale, Tennessee. She asked me to answer just four questions related to my writing journey, and I obliged. I came across our correspondence this morning, and after reading over my answers, I thought, perhaps, her questions paired with my answers may be of some benefit to my blog readers. I’ve pasted the text of the interview below. Enjoy!

Deyse: What are you working on now?

Amber: As a freelance writer, I have piles of works in progress on my desk throughout the year. Even though it is the end of summer, I am working on articles for the fall and winter issues of magazines. For example, I just completed “The Great Pumpkin,” for Sea Island Life Magazine’s fall issue. I’m almost finished with “Oh Christmas Tree,” an article GEORGIA Magazine will publish in December about the experience of going to a Christmas tree farm to find and cut a tree. And I’m trying to find a magazine editor interested in an article I wrote about growing pecan trees, harvesting pecans, and creating Southern pecan-based delicacies like pecan pie and pecan divinity (Note: I sold the pecan article to GRIT Magazine shortly after the interview. It will appear in their November/December 2016 issue). I pitch ideas to editors several times a month, so that type of work (idea development and sending out query letters) is always ongoing.

At the computer...

At the computer…

I still promote Project Keepsake (www.ProjectKeepsake.com), and because I sincerely believe everyone has a keepsake and every keepsake has a story to tell, I continue my quest to help people write and share stories about keepsakes. I haven’t decided whether I will publish a second volume of keepsake stories yet, however, I still continue sharing these magical stories on my blog and through social media.

I facilitate workshops on freelance writing, writing family stories, writing about keepsakes, and other topics. I’m in the process of making my workshops available via podcasts and through interactive web conferencing. Writing is a business, and you have to constantly strive to be relevant and reach readers and paying clients. It’s the only way to make money in the business, unless you are a Rick Bragg, Stephen King, or Anne Lamont, who I am not.

I am also working on a novel with the working title, Daylily. I’ve reached into my background as an engineer for inspiration. My story begins with a horrific industrial accident that takes a man’s life. My main character, a female engineer working in the facility, is blamed for the accident. My story drifts through its arc as the main character runs away to a daylily farm to regain her sanity and figure out how to clear her name. I’ve always been a nonfiction writer, and writing fiction has been somewhat of a challenge for me. I’ve joined a critique group to help me progress through the writing process and get feedback. I hope to have a first draft of Daylily completed by spring next year (Note: I didn’t make my deadline. I’m still working on the novel).

Deyse: How have libraries been a part of your life?

Amber: I credit the public library in Warner Robins, Georgia with planting the “book fever” seed in my soul. Growing-up, I was drawn to books, especially picture books with their whimsical words and illustrations. I loved the way books felt in my little-girl hands and the way the pages smelled. I loved my hometown’s public library, which was connected to our local gym and recreation department. A trip to basketball practice was always followed by a quick visit to the adjoining library. I remember browsing the shelves, collapsing onto the floor to flip through the first pages of books, the mechanical stamping sound the librarian’s machine made that transferred the due dates to the the library card, the hush-hush silence of the library that contrasted with the loudness of the basketball gym and the recreation department’s pool room, and most of all, I remember the euphoria of skipping to the car with an armful of books.

I wanted to share the joy of the reading experience with others, so as a little girl, I often crawled under my family’s dining room table with my stash of library books and read them to a captive audience of disheveled dolls and thread bare stuffed animals.

As a teenager, I spent after-school hours at the library with friends. I grew up in a time before personal computers and the Internet, so the library was my lifeline for research. I also enjoyed plucking novels from the shelves and reading great works such as A Separate Peace, Of Mice and Men, The Diary of Anne Frank, and Catcher in the Rye. I feasted on the quirky tales of Flannery O’Connor and felt a special bond with her.

At some point during my childhood and teen years, my attraction to stories and my appetite for reading evolved into the desire to write, but I did not pursue a career in writing—not then. I was a child who possessed strong math skills and an insatiable love of science, so I was herded toward a career in engineering. I tucked my dreams of writing away for several years. But again, it all started at the library.

After my book, Project Keepsake was released in 2014, several libraries around Georgia and Alabama invited me to speak at their “Friends of the Library” meetings and events about the book, storytelling, writing, and keepsakes. I’ve really enjoyed discovering new libraries tucked away on the backroads of Georgia. I was in Hazlehurst, Georgia last week for a book signing, and when I stepped into the Jeff Davis Public Library, the familiar aroma of books greeted me like an old friend.

Deyse: What is your favorite book and why?

Amber: My favorite book is Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird.” As a child of the South, so much of Lee’s novel resonates with me—the sultry summer days of the South, the curiosity and mischief of children, the dialogue, the lovable, charismatic members of the community, the unfathomable cruelty of racial injustice, etc. I had never seen myself and my life portrayed in literature until I read Ms. Lee’s masterpiece as a young adult, and it shook me to my core. She so eloquently defined my dilemma—my struggle of loving and admiring my homeland and my beloved family, even though the ugliness of racism whirls around me every day. Just as Scout tries to make sense of it all, I’ve spent an entire lifetime trying to reconcile the differences in my head. Strong writing. Strong story. Strong message. I still cry when I read it, and yes, I read it every few years and savor it like a glass of fine muscadine wine.

Deyse: Any advice for today’s college students?

Amber: I have lots of advice for aspiring writers. I’ve written lots of motivational and informational posts for writers on my blog at www.ambernagle.com. For beginning writers, I recommend “The Reality of Writing” and “Hook, Line, and Sinker”.

Here are a few of my general tips:

  1. Read. Read volumes. Read all sorts of material. Reading will make you a better writer.
  2. Write. Write a lot. Put pen to paper (or fingertips to keys) and write fearlessly. Make time to write and write!
  3. Find a tribe of writers and contribute—ask for help from those with experience and offer assistance to those you can help.
  4. Don’t be discouraged by rejection or failure. Just smile and know that it is part of the journey and all writers go through it. I often tell students in my workshops that they will never hit a home run if they don’t step up to the plate and swing.
  5. If you fail at something (and you will), learn the lessons from the experience, put the experience behind you, and move forward.

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